Your Exercise Session

 

  1. CHECK YOUR RESTING HEART RATE
    Is it in your normal range? For most people, a normal resting heart rate is between 50 – 80 beats per minute (bpm). Remember, that most people with heart disease are taking a beta blocker, which lowers resting and exercise heart rates.
  2. WARM UP (5 – 10 minutes, low-intensity walk)
    Warming up is a very important part of your exercise session.

    Your warm up helps your body transition from rest to exercise, stretches muscles, increases blood flow, and elevates body temperature. A warm up may reduce your chance of musculoskeletal injury, angina, and threatening ventricular dysrhythmias.

  3. AEROBIC EXERCISE SESSION
    Your aerobic exercise session will consist of continuous, repetitive physical activities like walking or biking. It is recommended that you perform 30 – 60 minutes of exercise in one continuous bout, or in short multiple bouts, throughout the day. Check your heart rate regularly throughout each session.
  4. COOL DOWN (5 minutes, low intensity walk)
    A cool down helps you recover from the endurance phase of your exercise session by allowing your heart rate and blood pressure to gradually return to near resting values. The cool down reduces your chance of post-exercise hypotension (low blood pressure), dizziness, allows body heat to dissipate, promotes lactic acid removal from working muscles, and reduces the likelihood of threatening ventricular dysrhythmias.
  5. CHECK YOUR RECOVERY HEART RATE
    A quick recovery of your heart rate to near resting values during the cool down is a sign of a well conditioned cardiovascular system.
  6. FLEXIBILITY TRAINING
    The cool down is a great time to perform flexibility training (stretching) as your muscles are warm and pliable.
  7. RESISTANCE TRAINING
    Performing resistance training 2 – 3 times per week can increase muscle strength and endurance. The enhancement of muscle strength can help every day tasks (like carrying groceries or climbing the stairs) become easier and decreases the load on your cardiovascular system when performing these tasks.
Last updated: Fri, 2012-10-26 16:01