Because the beat goes on

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Born into a musical family and inspired at an early age by the rhythms of Paul Simon, music became Connor’s passion. An abnormality in his hand prevented him from playing the drums. Frustrated by this Connor visited his family doctor and a nerve specialist. It was then that he was referred to St. Joseph’s Hand and Upper Limb Centre (HULC).

From the minute Connor and his parents met with Dr. Ross and the team at HULC, they knew that things were going change to for the better.

Connor with the drums

“Dr. Ross was completely focused on me when we came to meet him. It didn’t matter how busy it was, he gave me his undivided attention,” said Connor. Leading up to their appointment, Connor and his family had heard about the quality of care at St. Joseph’s, throughout their journey, they felt cared for. Everyone they connected with showed concern, seemed to know what we needed, how we felt and anticipated their needs.

Upon examination, Dr. Ross shared with Connor that he had thumb hypoplasia type two. Basically there was a lack of muscle growth in Connor’s hand near his thumb. The only solution was surgery.

It is through your support, that Connor had access to some of the finest surgical facilities available. Over the past few years, you have contributed to the creation of a new Surgical Centre, new procedure rooms in clinics and surgical equipment you have funded. All of this, in addition to the expert surgical care by Dr. Ross’ team, meant a positive outcome for Connor.

Connor’s surgery involved taking a tendon out of his ring finger and putting it into his thumb. Once the cast and pin were removed, therapy started. Today, he can manipulate things more easily than prior to his surgery, pinch with strength and in fact now his right hand is stronger than his left.

Connor and his family are grateful for the care they received and consider Dr. Ross, the “Michaelangelo” of surgery.

 

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