Congratulations to the 2014 President's Awards for Leadership recipients

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These awards recognize formal and informal leaders who are making outstanding contributions to the mission, culture and performance of St. Joseph’s. 

The Aspiring Leader Award recognizes an individual who has shown significant skill development, has recently risen to the challenges of a leadership role or activity, and has demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities and contributions to the organization. The recipient demonstrates effective leadership and performance in service delivery and relationship building.

The 2014 recipient is Regina Clara, a Consultant in Quality Measurement and Clinical Decision Support at St. Joseph’s Hospital (pictured below).

Recipient Regina Clara

A well-respected team player, Regina’s ability to motivate and align teams is improving confidence in the use of data that helps guide leaders’ decision making. 

Regina played a significant role in the reduction of cataract wait times by 16 per cent through coaching and collaboration with the director, physicians and secretaries in the department of Ophthalmology. Continually striving to improve reports, she developed tools to help clinical leaders forecast wait times with greater precision, and holds others accountable for the quality of their record keeping and performance. 

In addition to her management of the St. Joseph's Surgical Wait Times information system, Regina also manages the Allied Health InfoMed Workload system and provides training and refreshers to Allied Health staff across the organization. She recently took on the challenge of mentoring the first student intern the department ever hired. Through effective coaching, supervision and providing the student with a wide variety of projects, she made it an excellent learning experience that is positively impacting the team. 

Regina’s work ethic, attention to detail and commitment to lifelong learning are traits her co-workers value and admire. They always know they can call upon her many talents including project management skills and assisting with technical issues.

Overwhelmed by the nomination, “I feel privileged to be part of St. Joseph’s and the Quality Measurement and Clinical Decision Support team” says Regina “your vote of confidence means the world to me."


The Leadership in Mission Award recognizes a St. Joseph’s leader who has made an outstanding contribution to the hospital’s mission. This award celebrates extraordinary efforts to exemplify and advance St. Joseph’s roles and values as a Catholic, academic and community-oriented health care provider. This leader is an effective change agent and a forward-thinker – the type of leader others want to follow or work with in partnership.  At the same time, they lead in keeping with the example of our founders, upholding our rich history and traditions.

There are two 2014 recipients:  Dr. Michael Milo, Psychiatrist with the London ACT 3 team and Dr. Bill Payne, Family Medicine Site Chief at Parkwood Institute’s Main Building. 

 Mission Award recipient

Described as “a truly servant leader” Dr. Milo (pictured above) leads with his heart and continuously advocates to make a difference for the most vulnerable in our community. 

Dr. Milo cares for people facing severe and persistent mental illness, addictions, poverty and often homelessness. What some might consider a risky and sometimes thankless job gives Dr. Milo and his team a reason to go on. ”Dr. Milo sees the humanity in everyone and he has cultivated this culture within his team” says Jill Mustin-Powell, “there is no place or person Dr. Milo considers beyond his reach.”

While growing up, Sister Mary Doyle was a close family friend. “From a very young age she instilled a humane outlook in me” recalls Dr. Milo. “Our clients are an invisible minority so disadvantaged yet surprisingly resilient. We must lead with compassion and empathy no matter what; we will not be dismissed. These people deserve to be treated; they deserve to be saved.”

Dr. Milo is nonjudgmental, respectful and compassionate; putting the needs of his clients before his own. On one occasion he lent his own coat to a client who was found in the cold weather without one until such time that she was able to get own of her own. 

Not afraid to speak out about his work and the challenges his clients are sometimes forced to endure, he advocates for his clients and “looks for ways to bridge the divide between the people he serves and the system he works in.”

 Bill Payne

Known for his quiet demeanor, Dr. Payne (pictured above) consistently puts his patients’ needs in front of his own, often taking on additional work because “it’s the right thing to do for the patient.” 

When accepting the role on Complex Care over 25 years ago, Dr. Payne knew “I was taking on something very special”.

Dr. Payne was pivotal in implementing the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureas (MRSA) protocol on care unit 3AE, and changing opinions that nothing could be done to stop patients acquiring MRSA on this unit. He has developed strong collaborative relationships with infectious disease physicians who now provide onsite clinical consultation.

Not one to stand alone in the limelight, Dr. Payne acknowledges team effort. He “conveys a sense that we are all equal team members and colleagues, he listens to and values the opinions of all.

“He has a passion for his work that is contagious” says Barb Sutherland. He takes the time to be fully present in conversations with patients, family members and staff. He stresses that even the smallest successes of this vulnerable patient population should be celebrated. “His care focuses far beyond basic medical management to a holistic approach that consistently honours the dignity and value of each person he interacts with“.

“Caring for the spirit is hard to measure,” says Dr. Payne, “but on Complex Care we are able to augment that spirit, so these people, who have often endured a horrendous life-altering event, can plan to move on with a new reality.”

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